Stephen March
books

The Gold Piano tells the story of Emerson Wainwright, a young man whose idyllic life in a small North Carolina town is turned upside down. Emerson enrolls at an under-funded historically black college a hundred miles away, attending on a minority grant. As the only white student living on campus, he struggles with his loneliness and his role as an outsider.

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The characters in Tell Him You Saw Me do not live in mainstream America: they are denizens of the swamps, back roads, red clay fields, mountaias and gritty, urban wastelands of the Deep South—people who often find themselves at the crossroads of loss and redemption. And as their journeys unfold, they encounter puzzlement, heartache, and rare moments of grace with honesty and a stubborn will to survive.

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Hatteras Moon offers a unique blend of adventure, suspense, romance, and international political intrigue. Hatteras Moon tells the story of Virgil Gibson, an English professor whose friendship with a trawler boat captain and part time smuggler draws him into a world of violence, evil, and revenge.

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North Carolina writer March (Catbird) has written an accomplished, intricate coming-of-age tale set in a small Southern city where Jesse, the 16-year-old narrator, is always getting into violent scrapes. Abandoned by his mother, his father brain-damaged and institutionalized after a brutal mugging, he's living with and sorely testing his Uncle G.T., a hardworking roofer, when he's arrested for vandalizing a synagogue.

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To say that Stephen March's novel, Catbird, sticks to a reader like July in the South is not a bad thing. The Elizabeth City author is so adept at creating a memorable story that it is difficult to release the tale upon finishing the last page. That is a good thing, because there is plenty to ponder in March's first published novel. He focuses on Southern folk attempting to survive family history and life in general. But to slot his writing solely as Southern would be only partially true.

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Love to the Spirits was the winner of the Independent Publishers' Book Award for Short Story Fiction, 2005. This debut is a collection of stories that feature people in moments of crisis and transition, who make their journeys with subtle, often comic, grace.

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Readers at first may not find Stephen March's novella, Armadillo, beautiful. It's filled with evil. For fun, a sociopath named Cross turns his pit bull on a pet armadillo owned by Wanda. She poisons the dog in revenge. He hires two thugs to rape and beat her and crucify her canary. Meanwhile, he's running a body shop that paints hot cars. He underpays his employees, Chuck and Ajax. He revels in having the upper hand and keeps down-and-out folk indebted to him through fear. He's a slumlord and a misogynist with a vile mouth and a safe filled with cash.

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Stephen March is a novelist, short story writer, and songwriter whose work is set in the American South. His published books include Armadillo, a novella; Love to the Spirits, a short story collection; Catbird, a novel; and Strangers in the Land of Egypt, a novel published in May, 2009 by Permanent Press (New York). Armadillo won the Texas Review Press Prize in the Novella. Love to the Spirits won the Independent Publisher Award for Short Fiction 2005, and Catbird was chosen as a Book Sense Notable by the American Booksellers Association. He lived in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, until his death in 2014.



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